The New Political Islam: Human Rights, Democracy and Justice

DR. EMMANUEL KARAGIANNIS Editorial note: This blog post is based on Dr. Karagiannis’ new book on The New Political Islam: Human Rights, Democracy and Justice. The rise of political Islam is a modern phenomenon characterized by heterogeneity and complexity. It can best be described as a social movement embodied by three generations: the Islamist nationalists,… Read More The New Political Islam: Human Rights, Democracy and Justice

The Changing Role and Position of Turkish Armed Forces in Turkish Foreign Policy

SELCUK AYDIN The Turkish Armed Forces have been discussed substantially during the last few years in the context of Turkish Foreign Policy due to new developments in the military; such as building a military base in Qatar and Somalia, technological transformation, the S400 strategic defence system deal with Russia, and operations in Iraq and particularly… Read More The Changing Role and Position of Turkish Armed Forces in Turkish Foreign Policy

Amphibiosity, the Royal Marines and the Defence Debate in the UK

PROF ANDREW DORMAN, PROF MATTHEW UTTLEY, MS ARMIDA VAN RIJ The House of Commons Defence Committee (HCDC) has recently released a report emotively entitled ‘Sunset for the Royal Marines?’ The report followed on from the HCDC’s rapid inquiry into the future of the UK’s amphibious capability in the wake of a series of press reports… Read More Amphibiosity, the Royal Marines and the Defence Debate in the UK

The Defence Review and the Military High Command: Do changes in personnel numbers suggest that the armed forces are capable of modernising themselves?

PROF ANDREW DORMAN*, PROF MATTHEW UTTLEY, & DR BENEDICT WILKINSON In December 2017, General Sir Nicholas Carter, Chief of the General Staff (CGS) exchanged ‘Letters to the Editor’ in The Times with Frank Ledwidge, one of our King’s Department of War Studies colleagues.[1] At issue was the size of the senior officer corps compared to… Read More The Defence Review and the Military High Command: Do changes in personnel numbers suggest that the armed forces are capable of modernising themselves?

Is the use of nuclear weapons more likely now? Well, yes…

DR ROD THORNTON Nuclear weapons are, it seems, becoming more and more of a factor in the thinking about how future major wars will be conducted. The recently released United States Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) points to the fact that Washington now wants to increase the size of its nuclear arsenal. Specifically, it seeks to… Read More Is the use of nuclear weapons more likely now? Well, yes…

The ethical legitimacy of military outsourcing

ROBERT PARR is currently a PhD Student with the Defence Studies Department of King’s College London. Increased levels of uptake from the commercial security sector by national governments in the post-9/11 era have spawned a large body of academic research, the majority of which is centred around the connected questions of why this phenomenon has… Read More The ethical legitimacy of military outsourcing

This is what communication failure looks like: Visuals at the North Korean border

DR NICHOLAS MICHELSEN, Director of Research, King’s Centre for Strategic Communications The following reflects on a recent trip to the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) between The Republic of Korea (ROK) and The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) conducted with War Studies Head of Department Professor Michael Rainsborough. We were in South Korea by invitation of… Read More This is what communication failure looks like: Visuals at the North Korean border

Current Russian and Chinese ways of warfare: the end (?) of military violence in peer-state conflict

DR ROD THORNTON When it comes to the winning of wars, it might be thought that military organisations today, just as they have always done, would be concentrating their efforts on how best to use kinetic force. Military violence is, after all, what militaries do. But not, it seems, any more – or at least… Read More Current Russian and Chinese ways of warfare: the end (?) of military violence in peer-state conflict