Better the devil you know? Galileo, Brexit, and British defence space strategy

DR BLEDDYN E. BOWEN Bleddyn Bowen is a Lecturer in International Relations and expert in space warfare, space policy, and the politics of outer space at the School of History, Politics, and International Relations at the University of Leicester. He was published in several academic journals, contributed op-eds to numerous professional outelts including the LSE’s… Read More Better the devil you know? Galileo, Brexit, and British defence space strategy

‘Counter-Insurgency Against Kith and Kin’: British Army Combat and Cohesion in Northern Ireland

DR EDWARD BURKE Dr Burke is Assistant Professor in International Relations at the University of Nottingham. ‘An Army of Tribes: British Army Cohesion, Deviancy and Murder in Northern Ireland’ is published in paperback by Liverpool University Press, and is available here. Today’s officers in the British Army who served in Northern Ireland during Operation Banner… Read More ‘Counter-Insurgency Against Kith and Kin’: British Army Combat and Cohesion in Northern Ireland

History on Film: Entertainment or Accuracy?

DR TIM BENBOW  Warning: contains spoilers for the film ‘Dunkirk’, and unashamedly subjective opinions on several other films… Historians are, I understand, notorious for offering their opinions (sought or otherwise) on the accuracy of films or television shows that touch on real events.  Astonishingly, these informed views are not always welcomed by the people watching… Read More History on Film: Entertainment or Accuracy?

Military identities, conventional capability and the politics of NATO standardisation at the beginning of the Second Cold War, 1970-1980

DR ALEX GOULD & DR MATTHEW FORD The need to standardise equipment, weapons and doctrine in NATO was recognized as a strategic imperative from the onset of the Cold War. As Eliot Cohen noted in an article published in Foreign Policy in 1978, ‘non-standardised armies require unique and separate supply lines, making wide-ranging manoeuvres difficult…neighbouring troops… Read More Military identities, conventional capability and the politics of NATO standardisation at the beginning of the Second Cold War, 1970-1980

2018 – will the year of the Royal Air Force be any better than 2017 was for the Royal Navy?

PROF ANDREW DORMAN, PROF MATTHEW UTTLEY, MS ARMIDA VAN RIJ, & DR BENEDICT WILKINSON If 2017 was the ‘Year of the Royal Navy (RN)’ then presumably 2018 is the de facto year of the Royal Air Force (RAF) as it celebrates 100 years since its formation on 1st April 1918. For the RN, 2017 proved more… Read More 2018 – will the year of the Royal Air Force be any better than 2017 was for the Royal Navy?

The Changing Role and Position of Turkish Armed Forces in Turkish Foreign Policy

SELCUK AYDIN The Turkish Armed Forces have been discussed substantially during the last few years in the context of Turkish Foreign Policy due to new developments in the military; such as building a military base in Qatar and Somalia, technological transformation, the S400 strategic defence system deal with Russia, and operations in Iraq and particularly… Read More The Changing Role and Position of Turkish Armed Forces in Turkish Foreign Policy

Amphibiosity, the Royal Marines and the Defence Debate in the UK

PROF ANDREW DORMAN, PROF MATTHEW UTTLEY, MS ARMIDA VAN RIJ The House of Commons Defence Committee (HCDC) has recently released a report emotively entitled ‘Sunset for the Royal Marines?’ The report followed on from the HCDC’s rapid inquiry into the future of the UK’s amphibious capability in the wake of a series of press reports… Read More Amphibiosity, the Royal Marines and the Defence Debate in the UK

The Defence Review and the Military High Command: Do changes in personnel numbers suggest that the armed forces are capable of modernising themselves?

PROF ANDREW DORMAN*, PROF MATTHEW UTTLEY, & DR BENEDICT WILKINSON In December 2017, General Sir Nicholas Carter, Chief of the General Staff (CGS) exchanged ‘Letters to the Editor’ in The Times with Frank Ledwidge, one of our King’s Department of War Studies colleagues.[1] At issue was the size of the senior officer corps compared to… Read More The Defence Review and the Military High Command: Do changes in personnel numbers suggest that the armed forces are capable of modernising themselves?

Is the use of nuclear weapons more likely now? Well, yes…

DR ROD THORNTON Nuclear weapons are, it seems, becoming more and more of a factor in the thinking about how future major wars will be conducted. The recently released United States Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) points to the fact that Washington now wants to increase the size of its nuclear arsenal. Specifically, it seeks to… Read More Is the use of nuclear weapons more likely now? Well, yes…