Deterring Russian cyber warfare: the practical, legal and ethical constraints faced by the United Kingdom

Rod Thornton and Marina Miron Contrary to its normal positioning in terms of defence policy, the United Kingdom has come across as notably aggressive when it comes to advertising its offensive cyber warfare capabilities. Indeed, ‘Britain’ as one Russian source accusingly – and accurately – puts it, was ‘the first country in the world to… Read More Deterring Russian cyber warfare: the practical, legal and ethical constraints faced by the United Kingdom

Sovereign Control and Ocean Governance in the Regulation of Maritime Private Policing

This post is the second in an ongoing series showcasing interdisciplinary research in the Defence Studies Department. You can read the first here. Alex Gould In recent decades, new public-private policing governance structures everywhere have constituted new forms of authority and political order in the contemporary world. Abrahamsen and Williams have argued that the security… Read More Sovereign Control and Ocean Governance in the Regulation of Maritime Private Policing

Sultan Qaboos of Oman’s Policy of Strategic Neutrality

Dr. Michael Gunther The Sultanate of Oman occupies an important strategic position in the world as the state responsible for the southern portion of the Straits of Hormuz. For nearly fifty years, Sultan Qaboos bin Said steered Oman’s national strategy as its chief of state, senior diplomat, and commander of the armed forces. He followed… Read More Sultan Qaboos of Oman’s Policy of Strategic Neutrality

The unfortunate operational level: Five good reasons to review our operational level structures.

To see in the New Year, Defence-in-Depth is re-publishing its three most-viewed posts of 2019. At No. 2, a post from the MRes programme on the evolving concept of the operational level, and its utility in operational planning processes today. JONATHAN L This post is the second of two articles on the operational planning process… Read More The unfortunate operational level: Five good reasons to review our operational level structures.

The Furlough Mutiny and the Struggle for Cassino in the Second World War

To see in the New Year, Defence-in-Depth is re-publishing its three most-viewed posts of 2019. At No. 3, Jonathan Fennell’s account of the furlough mutiny in New Zealand and its impact on the war in the Mediterranean in 1944. JONATHAN FENNELL Jonathan Fennell is author of Fighting the People’s War: The British and Commonwealth Armies… Read More The Furlough Mutiny and the Struggle for Cassino in the Second World War

Strategic Studies Slapstick: A Review of Patrick Porter’s Looking Back: WWIII Remembered

Dr. Jeffrey H. Michaels Dr. Michaels is Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London In the original script of Stanley Kubrick’s Dr Strangelove, the film concludes with a custard pie fight in the War Room. Thankfully, Kubrick had the good sense to avoid the full slapstick approach and chose to… Read More Strategic Studies Slapstick: A Review of Patrick Porter’s Looking Back: WWIII Remembered

Analyzing Weapons Acquisition through the Prism of Future War

Warren Chin James Kurth posed the question of ‘why we buy the weapons we do’ in an article in the magazine, Foreign Policy in 1973. Surprisingly, forty-seven years later, we are still trying to provide a satisfactory answer regarding why we spend so much money on technologically complex weaponry; weapons acquisition typically accounts for over… Read More Analyzing Weapons Acquisition through the Prism of Future War